Music Director Christopher Warren-Green will open the Charlotte Symphony’s 90th season with a concert featuring works by some of Italy’s most celebrated composers, including Vivaldi’s beloved The Four Seasons. 

The performances take place Oct. 15 at 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 16 at 7:30 p.m.; and Oct. 17 at 3 p.m. 

Vivaldi’s Four Seasons will replace the previously announced Russian Masters program to accommodate a reduced orchestra and allow for additional spacing onstage for wind and brass players who are unable to be masked. 

The concerts will open with Respighi’s Trittico Botticelliano, a work inspired by three famous paintings by Sandro Botticelli: Spring, The Adoration of the Magi, and The Birth of Venus. 

The program will also include the Intermezzo from Mascagni’s opera Cavalleria Rusticana; Biber’s Battalia for Strings and Continuo; and Vivaldi’s musical depiction of the four seasons featuring violinist Paul Huang as soloist. 

The Saturday performance will be broadcast on WDAV 89.9 (wdav.org). 

Radio host Fred Child — from American Public Media’s “Performance Today,” will host the broadcast live from the Knight Theater. Christopher Warren-Green and Fred Child will lead a discussion about the evening’s repertoire and composers an hour before each performance in the Wells Fargo Pre-Function Space at the Knight Theater. 

These pre-concert talks are free and open to all ticket-holders. Tickets start at $24 (subject to change) and are available now through charlottesymphony.org.

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